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April 2016

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CASE STUDY: APPLYING THE LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP PRINCIPLES TO ENABLE EXELLENCE IN THOSE IN THE FRONT LINE OF A BUSINESS

By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership.

One of the key roles in a vehicle tracking and recovery business is that of installation technician. A good installation can literally mean the difference between life and death if there is a hijacking and the device fails to activate. Further to this, the person who installs the device in the vehicle is, for most customers, the only face-to-face contact they have with the service provider. The installation technician is synonymous with the company’s brand. In 2014 a small team was constituted with the purpose of applying the Legitimate Leadership principles for enabling excellence in those in the role of installation technician in a leading South African vehicle tracking and recovery business. What the team did and the results achieved are outlined below.

READ THE FULL CASE STUDY, AND LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP’S COMMENTS ON IT, BY CLICKING HERE

 

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VIGNETTE CASE STUDY:TURNING A SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT TEAM AROUND
By Teigue Payne, Legitimate Leadership.

THE SITUATION:

C, a well-educated young manager in banking information technology (IT) – a “millennial” – found that modest input of the concepts of the Legitimate Leadership Model helped him change an immature project team into a high-performing, happy team.

C has qualifications in business finance and IT, as well as an MBA. He works for a major investment bank in South Africa.

In late 2014, he was charged with putting together a team of about 14 people consisting of vendors (including business analysts, developers and internal testers) to develop “a piece of technology which would add value for the bank”.

READ THE FULL CASE STUDY BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: WHY LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP IS EMPHASIZING COURAGE
By Teigue Payne, Legitimate Leadership.

Legitimate Leadership has held two events recently about the subject of courage at work – a one-day workshop in July 2015 and a breakfast with presentations and discussion in March 2016. Why is Legitimate Leadership emphasizing this subject so much; why does it regard courage at work as so important? After all, the workplace is (hopefully) not Okinawa and okay physical courage is not a premier requirement for success at work.

But putting intent, which is fundamental in the Legitimate Leadership Model, into practice requires moral courage.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

 

Panel members at the recent Legitimate Leadership breakfast on Courage At Work, from left: Ian Munro, director of Legitimate Leadership; Leonie van Tonder, chief operating officer of Afrika Tikkun; Wendy Lambourne, director of Legitimate Leadership; and David Harding, former operations director of AEL Mining Services and the guest speaker.

Panel members at the recent Legitimate Leadership breakfast on Courage At Work, from left: Ian Munro, director of Legitimate Leadership; Leonie van Tonder, chief operating officer of Afrika Tikkun; Wendy Lambourne, director of Legitimate Leadership; and David Harding, former operations director of AEL Mining Services and the guest speaker.

Some attendees at the recent Legitimate Leadership breakfast on Courage At Work, from left: Lulu de Beer of MBD; Nothemba Mxenge of Legitimate Leadership; Athaly Khan of FNB Debt Review Centre; Clarissa Jooste of FNB Debt Review Centre; and Wendy Nagel of Legitimate Leadership.

Some attendees at the recent Legitimate Leadership breakfast on Courage At Work, from left: Lulu de Beer of MBD; Nothemba Mxenge of Legitimate Leadership; Athaly Khan of FNB Debt Review Centre; Clarissa Jooste of FNB Debt Review Centre; and Wendy Nagel of Legitimate Leadership.

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VIDEO: BLAME AND ACCOUNTABILITYSimonSinek
By Dr Brené Brown, bestselling American author, speaker and research professor specialising in vulnerability, courage, authenticity and shame.

COMMENT ON THIS VIDEO BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, DIRECTOR, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: Blaming others is one of the distinctive characteristics of a victim. Part of the leader’s job is to deal with victims wherever they are and whenever they arise. Legitimate Leadership has developed an exceptionally powerful tool for leaders to deal with victims called the Gripe to Goal process (refer to the book Legitimate Leadership (2012), pages 216-231).

SUMMARY OF THE VIDEO:

How many of us are blamers? For how many of us is the first thing we want to do when something goes wrong is to blame someone, to know whose fault it is?

How many of us will reel back in the sequence of events to find someone else to blame because of what they did in the past for what went wrong with me now?

The alternative is to say that you would rather it was your fault than no ones fault because that at least gives you some semblance of control.

Research shows that blame is really discharging of discomfort and pain. It has an inverse relationship with accountability.

Accountability, by definition, is a vulnerable process. It means me talking to you, and not blaming, and saying, Hey, my feelings are really hurt about this …

People who blame a lot seldom have the tenacity and grit to actually hold people accountable because they have spent all their energy raging for 15 seconds and figuring out whose fault something is.

And blaming is very corrosive in relationships and it is one of the reasons we miss opportunities for empathy. Because when something happens and we are hearing a story, we are not really listening – we are rather making the connection about whose fault it really was.

TO VIEW THE FULL VIDEO CLICK HERE

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