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A PERIODIC BULLETIN FROM LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP

September 2016

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For more information on any of these events, please email events@legitimateleadership.com or visit our website by clicking here

 

 

(Ivelin Radkov/Shutterstock.com) 10SECRET-022616-shutterstock Acountability

CASE STUDY: CREATING A PERFORMANCE EXCELLENCE CULTURE THROUGH MUTUAL ACCOUNTABILITY AND RESPONSIBILITY

By Nadine Jackson, associate, Legitimate Leadership.

When I started working with a group of 25 dealer principals (DPs) in a motor car retail organisation, I was immediately struck by the contrast of leadership styles among them. This was confirmed in the extensive leadership surveys carried out with their people, which indicated that some were experienced as very approachable and good-hearted, though this was often mistaken for weakness. Others however, ruled with an iron fist, requiring absolute control when managing their people.

READ THE FULL CASE STUDY BY CLICKING HERE

 

 

auditors

VIGNETTE CASE STUDY: THE AUDITOR WHO WOULD NOT LISTEN BECAUSE HE COULD NOT HEAR

By Teigue Payne, Legitimate Leadership.

This is a simple story of an auditor in a motor parts distribution centre, employee X, who would not listen because he could not hear.

Employee X had a reputation for hard work and devotion to the company and its brand. But he also had a reputation for being terrible at admin – and particularly at completing any tasks which arose from meetings which he had attended.

READ THE FULL CASE STUDY BY CLICKING HERE

 

 

Opportunity Missed and Taken Green Road Sign and Clouds

ARTICLE: ACCOUNTABILITY IS A HUGE OPPORTUNITY WHICH MANY BUSINESSES ARE MISSING

By Ian Munro, Director, Legitimate Leadership

When was the last time somebody said they would do something … and didn’t? When was the last time a service provider failed to meet a basic commitment? Perhaps it was a small thing. But perhaps also, it set off a bigger chain of events.

And although it might have been “inconsequential”, it probably means you won’t trust that person or organisation again – certainly not with something important.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

 

 

process-vs-results

ARTICLE: OF COURSE THE RESULT MATTERS BUT THE WAY TO ACHIEVE THE RESULT IS NOT TO FOCUS ON IT

By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership.

In my experience of corporations, middle and senior managers spend well over 50% of their time in setting, measuring and mincing about whether they and their subordinates are achieving the targeted results. In contrast, they spend far less of their time ensuring that their subordinates have the means, ability and accountability to achieve those results.

If the ratio was the other way round, better results would be achieved with much greater job satisfaction for all concerned.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

 

 

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VIDEO: WHY PEOPLE SUCK AT KEEPING PROMISES

By Alex Sheen, founder of Because I Said I Would, an organisation which (according to Sheen) has supporters in over 150 countries.

OUR SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO:

People are generally very, very bad at keeping promises.

Three examples illustrate this:

  • New Year’s resolutions: 40% of Americans make a New Year’s resolution but only 8% of those fulfil it.
  • Marriage: a huge commitment, for life! But 40-50% of marriages in the US end in divorce.
  • Politics: politicians are constantly making promises! But studies show that the majority of political promises are not kept.

All this is very well known. But what’s interesting is to ask why people are so bad at keeping promises.

15,942 is the average number of words a person speaks in a given day (according to a University of Arizona study on students).

It’s a lot of words, and many of those words are forward-looking. And the large number of those words which are forward-looking can be a problem.

But the number is not the only problem. It’s also a fact that our memories are terrible. We build memories which aren’t always factually true.

Flashbulb memories are made in emotional moments (for instance, what you were doing when 9/11 happened?). You would think they would be accurate – in fact, studies show that even flashbulb memories are unreliable.

But generally, our memories are terrible. For instance, can you say what is on a common coin? What’s on the front or the back and which way does it face?

But memory is not the only problem either.

Our choice of words is also a problem – sometimes the promise is already broken as the words come out of our mouths. Sometimes our promises are so big they are too epic.

Perhaps this comes from movies and books – often, at the core of these is a commitment which is epic. So we think that that is what promises have to be.

But life is not a movie. We need to be more particular about our word choices.

Often “promises” should be goals, not promises – especially when there are many external factors at play which could influence the result.

So let’s say you are a computer which has perfect memory and thinks about word choice deeply. But then there still a problem: motivation loss.

The Sheen two-people theory is that we look like two different people about a promise.

In the beginning, we are passionate about the promise. Then the emotion fades so that we are like two different people. One person wants to make the promise; the other person doesn’t want to show.

If you were told you would become a murderous zombie for 12 hours and thereafter revert to normal, you would probably chain yourself up and warn other people about your forthcoming weakness.

Why don’t we take that kind of action in real life when we know that we will weaken in regard to our promises (because if we break a promise, that inevitably hurts other people)?

One thing we could do is write down the promise and share it – for instance on social media, with 500 people. That might boost motivation because we are egotistical.

We have to think about forecasting our weakness and making changes (as you would chain yourself up if you were about to become a zombie). In other words we need a plan to protect people from our broken commitments.

But normally it just comes out of our mouth (“yes, yes I will do that …”). We don’t think about the time involved.

We also have very poor conception of time! It is said “you need to make time for…”, but in fact time cannot be made; it can only be reserved or marked. But not many people take their schedule/diary and mark it to ensure that a sequence of actions results in fulfilling a promise.

So, if you want to be good with your promises:

  • Be careful with your word choices.
  • Write important promises down so you don’t forget them.
  • Create motivators that chain you to your promises. Put steps into place and put them in your calendar.

We often think that what we need to solve X big problem is $1billion of funding. But sometimes in fact we just need people to do what they said they would do in the first place. The promises that we make, make the world.

TO VIEW THE FULL VIDEO CLICK HERE