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A PERIODIC BULLETIN FROM LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP

October 2016

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For more information on any of these events, please email events@legitimateleadership.com or visit our website by clicking here

 

 

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CASE STUDY: USING SUCCESSIVE LEADERSHIP PROFILES TO GAUGE SHIFTS IN LEADERSHIP BEHAVIOUR

By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership.

The individual leadership profile, used by Legitimate Leadership, is a compilation of feedback provided by direct reports (subordinates) about a leader/manager. A group profile is the aggregation of a number of individual leadership profiles for a particular entity.

With both individual and group profiles, the first profile done forms a useful baseline measure to compare with any subsequent profiles done.

This case study examines the shift in behaviours between a baseline group profile (done in April 2014) and a follow-up group profile done two years later (in April 2016). With the exception of one individual, the compositions of the two groups were identical.

READ THE FULL CASE STUDY BY CLICKING HERE

 

 

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VIGNETTE CASE STUDY: JUST SIT DOWN AND SPEAK TO THEM

By Teigue Payne, Legitimate Leadership.

The following is the description of the experience of a sales director in a successful motor dealership.

I had a very good sales lady – in fact, the top in the country for our brand. About eight months ago, she won a prize to go abroad because of her sales performance.

When she returned, her attitude had changed and she was very opinionated. She was still a good salesperson but now she had the attitude, “I’m untouchable, no one can tell me anything, and I’m going to have it my way”.

READ THE FULL CASE STUDY BY CLICKING HERE

 

 

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ARTICLE: TRUST, THE WORKPLACE CURRENCY

By Wendy Lambourne, director of Legitimate Leadership

During the turbulent late 1980s in South Africa, research into trust in management in South Africa’s gold mines produced unexpected results. Contrary to expectations, trust in management was not consistently low – despite job segregation, apartheid, rising union and political militancy, and increasing violence generally.

Rather, the degree to which managers were seen to be trustworthy or not varied immensely – not only from mine to mine, but even from one shaft to another on the same mine.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

 

 

 

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VIDEO: THE KEY DIFFERENCES BETWEEN LEADING AND MANAGING

By Dr John Kotter, professor of Leadership Emeritus at the Harvard Business School, and a New York Times best-selling author.

COMMENT ON THIS VIDEO BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: Legitimate Leadership has a very clear view of the distinction between management and leadership: management is what you apply to things; leadership pertains to people.

For organisational success and sustained results – organisational excellence, in other words – both management and leadership are required. Things like finances, systems, structures, facilities etc all need to be managed well. But our plea is: please don’t manage people, lead them. Because when you manage people you reduce them to the status of things.

As the Kotter says, in most companies today there is far more of an emphasis on management than leadership. As a result organisations are over-managed and under-led.

So our second plea is: lead more and manage less.

OUR SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO:

Be absolutely crystal clear in your own mind about the difference between leadership and management, and make sure that the people around you are also crystal clear about the difference.

Management is fundamentally a set of processes the most core of which are planning and budgeting, organising staffing, controlling and problem-solving. Management takes a system, an organisation, and makes it function the way it was designed to function – producing a good or service on time, on budget, the way it was designed to work.

Leadership by contrast is a set of processes for creating a vision of the future, for communicating that vision to people in a way that they will buy into it, and for creating an environment that motivates people to make that vision a reality. Leadership creates a system that managers manage, or takes staff and changes them in some fundamental ways to adapt to changes outside of the organisation, to grab opportunities, to duck hazards, to raise standards.

Both management and leadership are obviously very important, but if you don’t get it clear what you want, you run into big problems.

Most commonly, the speed of change external to the company goes up. Someone notices this and it starts affecting, for instance, the company’s financials. Management comes back and says “we need to do something about this, and we clearly need more better leadership at the top and just below that”.

And people really try hard to implement that. But they think that management is leadership. So what they work at improving is planning, budgeting and organising. And at a certain point you can become over-managed and under-led.

And it’s almost impossible (unless you have a monopoly) to be over-managed and under-led and be successful in the kind of world we live in today.

I see it in performance appraisals for instance. Improved leadership is being talked about more and more in business. But in the typical performance appraisal, most of the items required are management items.

What they are in effect doing is promoting more people who are good at management and reinforcing management, but not solving the real leadership problem which can help them deal with the increasingly turbulent and changing environment.

You have to understand the difference and the people around you need to understand the difference.

TO VIEW THE FULL VIDEO CLICK HERE