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A PERIODIC BULLETIN FROM LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP

April 2017

For more information on any of these events, please email events@legitimateleadership.com or visit our website by clicking here

 

CASE STUDY: LEADERSHIP IN TIMES OF ADVERSITY – JURGENS CI FACES THE MUSIC

In tough times, it’s much easier to cope when you have a workforce which is engaged and on your side. And, to get where you’re going, you have to help others get where they are going.

These were two lessons drawn by Bradley Salters, former managing director of Jurgens Ci, a South African manufacturer of caravans, from his two and half years of running the company (until it was recently sold). During that time, Salters jokes, “we probably had the monopoly on adversity”.

READ THE FULL CASE STUDY HERE BY CLICKING HERE

 

Grow to Care Facilitation at the Airplane Company

VIGNETTE CASE STUDY: THE AIRPLANE COMPANY, TAKING OFF – BUT NOT FROM A BURNING PLATFORM

By Leanne Maree, associate, Legitimate Leadership.

If a company has a burning platform, Legitimate Leadership’s Grow to Care programme will focus it on what needs to be done immediately.

If a company does not have a burning platform, the Grow to Care programme can still be useful to assist to bring the company out of complacency, to improve performance and productivity, to enhance positive behaviour, and to help it reach a new level.

And interventions like those done by Legitimate Leadership are best done at both the top and the bottom levels of the organisation’s people simultaneously.

These are among the insights that Leanne Maree, a Legitimate Leadership associate who is also an independent human resources consultant, has about a recent Grow to Care programme she did with a medium-sized South African developer and manufacturer of small aeroplanes.

READ THE FULL CASE STUDY HERE BY CLICKING HERE

 

PEOPLE WALK THROUGH FIRE ONLY FOR PEOPLE WITH WHOM THEY HAVE A PERSONAL, NOT PROFESSIONAL, CONNECTION

By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership.

One of the key differentiators between managers and leaders is the nature of the relationship that they have with their people. Good managers have “professional” relationships with their people such that there are reasonable levels of respect and trust between the parties. Leaders have something more. They have “personal” relationships with their people. They bond with their people at a deeper level and, as a result of this, their people are prepared to walk through fire for them.

The strength of the personal connections has nothing to do with whether the leader socialises with his people or not, nor whether he knows the names of their partner, offspring or pets. It goes beyond giving them due time and attention, liking them and holding them in high regard. All of these are preconditions for forging personal ties with one’s employees but they are not what causes the personal connection per se.

What generates the personal bond between manager and subordinate is the fact that the manager sincerely cares about her people, as human beings not only as human resources. It is at the end of the day an issue of the heart, not the head.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

 

LEADING EMPLOYEES FROM TAKING TO GIVING IN A CALL CENTRE

By Lulu de Beer a Legitimate Leadership associate and a former call centre company executive, writing for the call centre industry.

Every employer struggles with the issue of how to get employees to come to work every day and put in their best effort.

Imagine how much more time the leaders in the call centre would have if they didn’t have to monitor every employee every minute of the day and every step of the call centre process. And what time you would save if employees stayed in your organisation and you weren’t recruiting and training new employees repeatedly.

Think of how your productivity and results would improve if employees remained in the business for longer to fully use their experience and learning in the interests of the business results.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

 

VIDEO: THE PYGMALION EFFECT – LEADERS WHO BELIEVE ALL TEAM MEMBERS WILL SUCCEED WILL OUTPERFORM THOSE THAT DON’T

COMMENT ON THIS VIDEO BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, DIRECTOR, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: As a leader, where you pitch the standard is all-important.

I was once informed by a South African insurance company that “the national standard (and it always has been) is an average of seven policies sold per week”.

I was then told by a salesperson in Durban that she delivered an average of 11 policies per week. She would work over the weekend if necessary to make the target.

I asked her boss if she was the exception. “Everyone in my team delivers an average of 11 policies per week,” said the boss. “I know it is possible because I did it when I was a salesperson. I expect nothing less.”

I asked myself whether I had perchance come across an exceptional group of salespeople. Not at all, I concluded … I had come across an exceptional sales team leader!

OUR SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO (WITH HIGHLIGHTING BY US):

The fascinating leadership phenomenon called the Pygmalion or Rosenthal effect was first discovered in a classroom, but you’ll find its effects everywhere.

In a famous army experiment, in a 15-week army training course, 105 soldiers were assigned to instructors.

Before the course started each instructor was given the following message: “We have collected a lot of data regarding the trainees you will receive in the coming days. It considers psychological tests, grades from previous courses, and ratings by previous commanders. Based on this information we have predicted the command potential of the soldiers you are going to receive as High ones, Average ones, and unfortunately there are a few soldiers where we don’t have any data. Please learn their names and their scores by heart before they arrive.”

It’s important to know that at the time these instructors didn’t know that the classifications that had been given to the soldiers are in fact completely random – in other words, a soldier listed as High Command Potential could very well have been the worst soldier in the group or vice versa.

After the 16-week course each soldier was tested. The soldiers that were labelled High Command Potential significantly outperformed their classmates; those with an Average Command Potential scored the lowest; and the third group (those with an unknown performance potential) ended up in the middle.

The difference was quite big – 15% between the first group and the last group.

Isn’t that amazing?

So when we believe a team member has the ability to be a great performer, our belief becomes reality; the performance expectations we have for our team members are self-fulfilling prophecies.

That’s the Pygmalion effect.

But how does it work?

As soon as the instructors believed that some soldiers had better abilities than others, they started managing those individuals differently. Raising expectations triggers a leadership process that results in superior performers, so better leadership in turn has a direct positive effect on the superb subordinates’ performances; it kick-starts positive effects. Just imagine the extra boost you get when somebody is giving you positive attention.

Leaders get the performance they expect.

When they believe and expect low performance their expectations kick-start a negative spiral that leads to low performance.

But if we can imagine everybody to be a great performer, if we apply a can-do management style to everyone in the team – when we believe our team members have what it takes to succeed like those instructors believed the soldiers with High Command Potential did, the chance that they will actually succeed will be much higher.

So the Pygmalion effect teaches us that we have to be careful in what we believe. Most of us have the habit of labelling team member A as a high performer, B as average and as having reached her ceiling, and C as a low performer. But our labels are self-fulfilling prophecies.

For those that end up in the high performance category, that’s great – they’ll get the leader they deserve. But for those that we categorize as average or low performers, that is not the case because when we don’t expect greatness our leadership style won’t be great either. And thus we contribute to their failure.

So if we want to increase our team’s success rate we have to reconsider the relationship we have with all our team members, not only the ones with High Command Potential. We need to create a can-do environment, a place where we expect success from every team member, not only a few high performers.

Leaders who believe all team members will succeed will outperform those that don’t.

TO VIEW THE FULL VIDEO CLICK HERE