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An Organisation In A Disempowered, ‘Family Business’ Mode 
A “family atmosphere” in an organisation is generally regarded as being good for success. But it can also be somewhat disempowering. Legitimate Leadership had to show flexibility in assisting an organisation of this type …
Why Legitimate Leadership Comes From South Africa  
The Legitimate Leadership Model, in essence, strives to increase trust between management and non-management in all kinds of organisations …
The Importance Of Having A Vision Or Objective Which Solicits The Intention To Contribute 
Excellence in an organisation can only be achieved on the basis of the overall willingness of its members to contribute significantly more than what they take out …
Amazon Spent Years Learning What It Takes To Do Great Work.  These 4 Steps Contributed Most To Its Success
Amazon’s experience totally aligns with the Legitimate Leadership view on raising the bar or enforcing and raising standards …

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Question of the Month 
By Peter Jordan, associate, Legitimate Leadership.
I understand that to gain and retain legitimacy as a leader I need be values-driven, but I also need my job to support my family. What if retaining my job and acting in accordance with values are in conflict?
ANSWER: A leader who is seen to be driven by needs rather than by values will lose the trust of reports and hence her legitimacy as a leader. Therefore ultimately there can be no compromise.
However, before recklessly resorting to resignation, the following should be carefully considered … Read the full answer by clicking here

 

  To submit your question, e-mail [email protected] 

VIGNETTE CASE STUDY: ASSISTING AN ORGANISATION IN A DISEMPOWERED, ’FAMILY BUSINESS’ MODELEADING WITH THE AIM OF EMPLOYEES EXCELLING
By Nothemba Mxenge, associate, Legitimate Leadership  
A “family atmosphere” in an organisation is generally regarded as being good for success. But it can also be somewhat disempowering. Legitimate Leadership had to show flexibility in assisting an organisation of this type.
The organisation had a total staff of about 120 people with three management levels. Legitimate Leadership was requested by a new senior manager to assist in transforming the organisational culture. This manager had prior exposure to the Legitimate Leadership Model and perceived that the organisation was stuck in victim mode, which resulted in a disempowering culture.
The disempowerment, it later transpired, was largely due to employees knowing each other so well. They had generally worked there for many years and there was a family atmosphere. Members of staff looked upon their managers as their fathers and mothers – and even often addressed them as such.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

 ARTICLE: WHY LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP COMES FROM SOUTH AFRICA
By Teigue Payne, Legitimate Leadership.
WITH COMMENT BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, DIRECTOR, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP, AT THE END. 
The Legitimate Leadership Model, in essence, strives to increase trust between management and non-management in all kinds of organisations; it strives to decrease the fraction of the workforce which is disaffected and disengaged, and increase the fraction which is pro-establishment.
It is no coincidence that South Africa has been, and still is, a country where there is considerable research on disaffection and disengagement in the workforce. The latest World Economic Forum report on country competitiveness for 2016-2017, for instance, ranks South Africa as having the worst labour-employee relations in the world (137 out of 137 countries surveyed).
Arising from its long history of conquest, colonialism, industrialisation and apartheid, it is probably not surprising that South Africa is a leader in labour disaffection and disengagement.
The Legitimate Leadership Model originated from seminal research into trust in management in the South African gold mines in the late 1980s, during the apartheid era. However, contrary to expectation then, trust in management was not consistently low, but varied immensely, both across mines and even in different shafts on the same mine. .
READ THE FULL ARTICLE (INCLUDING COMMENT AT THE END) BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: THE IMPORTANCE OF HAVING A VISION OR OBJECTIVE WHICH SOLICITS THE INTENTION TO CONTRIBUTE
By Peter Jordan, associate, Legitimate Leadership. 
Excellence in an organisation can only be achieved on the basis of the overall willingness of its members to contribute significantly more than what they take out. In other words, they need to suspend their self-interest in the interests of others.
As the above has become more widely appreciated, companies have put in place various programmes to boost the contributions of their employees. Many of these programmes are of a financial nature such as incentive bonuses.
The payment of bonuses is consistent with the Legitimate Leadership principle of rewarding exceptional contribution. If applied as such, it is done in appreciation of past contribution and not as an incentive towards future contribution.
The risk of paying a bonus to secure future contribution is that it is likely to solicit greed from the recipients. In order to secure the same commitment, it becomes necessary to constantly repeat the payment as if it were an energy drug. And, as tolerance to the drug develops, more of it may need to be applied to achieve the same outcomes.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

 ARTICLE: AMAZON SPENT YEARS LEARNING WHAT IT TAKES TO DO GREAT WORK. THESE 4 STEPS CONTRIBUTED MOST TO ITS SUCCESS
By Justin Bariso, a US author and consultant. 
COMMENT ON THIS ARTICLE BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, DIRECTOR, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: Amazon’s experience totally aligns with the Legitimate Leadership view on raising the bar or enforcing and raising standards.
Amazon’s 4 Steps and how they equate to Legitimate Leadership’s Raising the Bar are as follows:
Step 1: High standards are teachable = the standard you expect is the standard you get.
Step 2: High standards are domain specific = you can have high standards in one area (like safety) and not in another area (like quality or leadership). There is no such thing as blanket high standards. The 7 requirements for implementing a standard need to be met with each and every standard. Only then will the desired standard become reality.
Step 3: High standards must be recognised = if you want excellence you need to describe excellence. Often simply clarifying what excellence looks like is sufficient to get excellence.
Step 4: High standards require realistic expectations = raise the bar in increments.
THE ARTICLE: Yesterday, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos published his annual letter to shareholders, and it’s got some great advice for anyone who is striving to do great work.
After commending Amazon employees for their commitment to excellence, and Amazon customers for pushing Bezos and his team to continue raising the bar, Bezos delivered a lesson in how to stay ahead of customer expectations.
It all comes down to maintaining high standards, he writes.
And how do you do that?
Bezos continues:
“The four elements of high standards as we see it: they are teachable, they are domain specific, you must recognize them, and you must explicitly coach realistic scope.”
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE