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Failing The Intent Test Doesn’t Just Erode Trust, It Contributes To Employee Mediocrity 
In a previous newsletter I wrote about how “passing the intent test” is an everyday opportunity. We often find ourselves in conversations with clients around this issue …
Effective leadership is easier said than done at the best of times. Leading with legitimacy is not necessarily difficult (it’s a simple matter of choosing giving over taking really), but it is certainly hard …
Leaders, If You Were A Radio Station, Are People Tuning Into Or Out Of Your Frequency? 
What do you think? Are you aware of the impact and influence you are having on the people around you?
Four Steps In Handling Mediocrity On Your Team 
Legitimate Leadership’s antidote to mediocrity is to cultivate an environment where people are happily discontented or where standards are continually enforced and raised …

 

E-mail events@legitimateleadership.com for more information

Question of the Month 
By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership.
Question:  When is a Legitimate Leadership intervention not appropriate?
Answer:  I used to believe that there were four situations in which a Legitimate Leadership intervention was not appropriate. All four situations (see Legitimate Leadership (the book) pg 281-283) remain valid, but there is a fifth – namely, when the leadership of the enterprise is relentless in their avoidance of holding people accountable …  Read the full answer by clicking here
 To submit your question, e-mail info@legitimateleadership.com 

VIGNETTE CASE STUDY: FAILING THE INTENT TEST DOESN’T JUST ERODE TRUST, IT CONTRIBUTES TO EMPLOYEE MEDIOCRITY
 By Josh Hayman, associate, Legitimate Leadership.
In a previous newsletter I wrote about how “passing the intent test” is an everyday opportunity. We often find ourselves in conversations with clients around this issue – in particular when discussing the very difficult question of continually trying to balance care and accountability. Managers often see this balance as something that cannot be sustained – either the manager displays care, or the manager gives accountability, and that these two acts are at opposite ends of a spectrum. When our need to “care” about our people becomes an excuse to expect less than the best from them, we run the risk of tolerating, or even encouraging, employee mediocrity.
To enable excellence in people, Care and Accountability are two complimentary ideas that must be held in the hand simultaneously, and it is precisely because we care that we give appropriate accountability.
READ THE FULL CASE STUDY BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE:LEADERS; IF YOU WERE A RADIO STATION, ARE PEOPLE TUNING INTO OR OUT OF YOUR FREQUENCY?
 By Wendy Nagel, associate, Legitimate Leadership.
What do you think? Are you aware of the impact and influence you are having on the people around you?
Are you occupying a leadership position OR demonstrating leadership? Depending on where you are, there will either be a high demand for your radio frequency or people will be turning you off.
The fact is, we don’t only lead at work … we lead in all aspects of our lives. I know for some this might pose a challenge, but here’s the thing: work is only one aspect of life. And yes, for some, work is everything (which may explain why you’re so frazzled and close to burnout – but that’s another issue for another time).
I am observing the energy of INTENTION more and more in my life, which notably includes work. Our intention is what is assessed in every single engagement with another human being. We are wired to determine the reason for somebody making the request/s or demand/s they make. As a result, we very quickly make a decision around the intent and whether or not it is in our best interests and so we either move towards it or away from it.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: FOUR STEPS IN HANDLING MEDIOCRITY ON YOUR TEAM
By Joseph Grenny, writing in Harvard Business Review. Joseph Grenny is a four-time New York Times bestselling author, keynote speaker, and leading American social scientist for business performance. He is the co-founder of VitalSmarts, an innovator in corporate training and leadership development.
COMMENT ON THIS ARTICLE BY WENDY LAMBOURNE OF LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: Legitimate Leadership’s antidote to mediocrity is to cultivate an environment where people are happily discontented or where standards are continually enforced and raised. Ultimately, there is only one performance standard: the best that you can be. When leaders insist on this, mediocrity is not possible. Indeed, “chronic mediocrity is a symptom of ineffective leadership, not anaemic personnel”. That mediocrity is a leadership failure is unequivocally true. Grenny’s four leadership practices are excellent as a means to eradicate mediocrity. They can be summarised as: (1) engineer a situation where people experience being the recipient of mediocre work, (2) provide a few key measures for the results of excellence, (3) encourage peer accountability – call colleagues out on mediocre performance, and (4) demonstrate, through example, an intolerance of mediocrity.
OUR SUMMARY OF THIS ARTICLE: The toughest test of managers is not how they deal with poor performance — it’s how they address mediocrity. There is no silver bullet to address lackluster performance but there are four leadership practices that can help.
I’ve been struck over the years watching executives opine in public about the need for “accountability” and “high performance,” then complaining helplessly in private about one or two middling members of their own team.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE