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What To Focus On For Organisational Excellence 
Sustainable organisational excellence is not about a focus on results OR a focus on people. It is about a focus on results AND a focus on people. Put another way, it is about a focus on people …
The World Belongs To The Happily Discontented
Good leaders make it their business to continually raise the bar or reset and implement standards of excellence. In doing so, they are practising  “tough love” …
What Makes Us Feel Good About Work 
At Legitimate Leadership we have come to believe that there are really only three reasons why employees will go the extra mile at work  …

 

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Question of the Month 
By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership.
Question:  Do Legitimate Leadership consultants find managers in client organisations who are simply not prepared to hold their people accountable. If so, what can be done about this?
Answer: Unfortunately yes, we often find managers who lack the will or testicular fortitude to ultimately hold people accountable for deliberate malevolence. When we have come across this reticence we have tried to coach the manager and persuade him or her to do this …  Read the full answer by clicking here
 To submit your question, e-mail info@legitimateleadership.com 

ARTICLE: WHAT TO FOCUS ON FOR ORGANISATIONAL EXCELLENCE
By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership. 
Sustainable organisational excellence is not about a focus on results OR a focus on people. It is about a focus on results AND a focus on people. Put another way, it is about a focus on people excellence.
Why the focus on people excellence? Simply because excellent results can only be achieved by excellent people.
Managers in most organisations today focus largely on the results; and setting goals and targets, and measuring progress against these. A limited amount of that effort goes into determining who needs to do what to achieve the desired results. Even less time is given to determining and then delivering the leadership actions which enable people to do what needs to be done to achieve the results.
When the results are not forthcoming, the typical managerial response is to increase the pressure on the result. Allied to this, management alters its reporting requirements – they require more reports on the results achieved, more often and in more detail.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: THE WORLD BELONGS TO THE HAPPILY DISCONTENTED
Co-written by Wendy Lambourne and Ian Munro, directors of Legitimate Leadership.
Good leaders make it their business to continually raise the bar or reset and implement standards of excellence. In doing so, they are practising “tough love”. They are challenging their people not to remain in their comfort zone, not to let standards deteriorate or slip over time, nor to accept that the current is “good enough”.
As soon as they have achieved a certain standard they replace that standard with a higher standard which they then relentlessly seek to achieve. Their goal is not to be better than the rest, or to be able to say that “OUR standard is THE standard in the country and throughout the WORLD”. Their goal is simply to continuously strive to be better than they were before.
This is because they know that the world belongs to the “happily discontented” – to those who focus on perfecting process over outcome. They know that a relentless lifting of standards is the bedrock of both individual and organisational excellence.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

VIDEO: WHAT MAKES US FEEL GOOD ABOUT WORK
By Dan Ariely, professor of psychology and behavioural economics at Duke University, USA.
COMMENT ON THIS VIDEO BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, DIRECTOR, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: At Legitimate Leadership we have come to believe that there are really only three reasons why employees will go the extra mile at work.
They believe the goals and objectives of the organisation they work for are worth going the extra mile for (Ariely’s ‘importance of meaning and purpose’).
They report to the kind of manager who kindles in them a preparedness to do, not just what is asked, but much, much more than that. Among other things this kind of manager acknowledges and demonstrates appreciation for what his people have contributed (Ariely’s gratitude).
They have such a passion for the work that they do that they want to apply all their skills and energy to doing it superbly well.
OUR SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO: Think about Adam Smith versus Karl Marx. Adam Smith had an important notion of efficiency. He gave an example of a pin factory. He said the making of pins have 12 different steps, and if one person does all 12 steps, production is very low. But if you get one person to do step 1, and one person to do step 2 and step 3 and so on, production can increase tremendously. And indeed, this is the reason for the Industrial Revolution and efficiency.
Karl Marx, on the other hand, said that the alienation of labor is incredibly important in how people think about the connection to what they are doing. And if you do all 12 steps, you care about the pin. But if you do one step every time, maybe you don’t care as much.
In the Industrial Revolution, Adam Smith was more correct than Karl Marx. But now we’re in the knowledge economy.  Is efficiency still more important than meaning? I think not. I think that as we move to situations in which people have to decide on their own about how much effort, attention, caring they are going to put in, how connected they feel to their work … all of a sudden Marx is more applicable.
READ THE FULL SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO BY CLICKING HERE
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