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Question of the Month
How long does it takes to recognise change in individuals, teams and organisations when applying the Legitimate Leadership Model? I expect there could be some fairly rapid change on a one-to-one basis, but wider change would presumably require consistency of approach and be subject to many other influencing factors.
Insights From Within An Organisation That Keeps Getting It Right
Africa Tikkun, one of South Africa’s largest non-profit organisations, assists many thousands of people in that country’s townships. But seven years ago, this extraordinary organisation set out, with Legitimate Leadership, to increase its employees’ level of engagement by showing employees that they also really mattered.
Building Cultures Where Givers Succeed
As an organizational psychologist, I (Adam Grant) spend a lot of time in workplaces, and I find paranoia everywhere. Paranoia is caused by people that I call “takers.” Takers are self-serving in their interactions. It’s all about “What can you do for me?”
The opposite is a giver. It’s somebody who approaches most interactions by asking, “What can I do for you?”

For more information regarding the above, please
E-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

Question of the Month 
By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership.
Question: How long does it takes to recognise change in individuals, teams and organisations when applying the Legitimate Leadership Model? I expect there could be some fairly rapid change on a one-to-one basis, but wider change would presumably require consistency of approach and be subject to many other influencing factors.
Answer: At an individual level, the one thing that can change in an instant is intent. I have seen this many times. For sustainable changes in behavior and practice our experience is that at least 12–15 months is needed. This is why our process for a group of leaders is of that duration. But embedding the Legitimate Leadership principles and practices so that they have real organizational impact is not a quick process. For big, complex organizations employing thousands of people it can take 3–5 years.
 To submit your question, e-mail info@legitimateleadership.com

WEBINAR: INSIGHTS FROM WITHIN AN ORGANISATION THAT KEEPS GETTING IT RIGHT
Africa Tikkun, one of South Africa’s largest non-profit organisations, assists many thousands of people in that country’s townships. But seven years ago, this extraordinary organisation set out, with Legitimate Leadership, to increase its employees’ level of engagement by showing employees that they also really mattered. The results of that exercise were dramatic and were part of a major turnaround in the organisation.
Then earlier this year, Africa Tikkun pivoted again: in response to the Covid 19 pandemic it changed direction from being an organisation which supported centre-registered families, to doing emergency mass distribution of food parcels to the broader community.
How Africa Tikkun achieved these changes, and the part that Legitimate Leadership played, was the subject of this webinar, which was held on 12 November and was attended by 111 people.
READ THE FULL REPORT BY CLICKING HERE
TO VIEW THE VIDEO OF THIS WEBINAR CLICK HERE

VIDEO: BUILDING CULTURES WHERE GIVERS SUCCEED
By Adam Grant, author of Give and Take, of Wharton University, USA.
COMMENT BY WENDY LAMBOURNE, LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP, ON THIS VIDEO: Adam Grant’s research indicates that 19% of people are “takers”, 56% are “matchers”, and 25% are “givers”. In Legitimate Leadership’s view, “matchers” (that is, those who give to get) are still takers but the giving they do is in order to get. So in fact 25% are givers and 75% are takers. This is our experience as well: in any group between 15-30% are there to give and 70-85% are there to take. So there are currently more givers than takers at work. We also agree with Adam Grant on the following: that the most successful people in the world are givers; that while there is a problem with taking, there is nothing wrong with receiving; and that you should recruit givers not takers; and that takers need to be dealt with.
However we don’t agree with Adam Grant on two matters. Firstly, Adam Grant’s type of giving is only one form of giving: generosity. There are in fact two forms of giving: generosity and courage. With generosity, you risk losing things associated with yourself; with courage, you are putting yourself on the line. Secondly, Adam Grant says that the most unsuccessful people in the world are also givers. We believe that why they are not successful is not because they are givers but because they give inappropriately. Giving is not about being nice, about burning out or allowing others to take advantage. Successful givers give either generosity or courage, whichever of the two is appropriate in the situation.
OUR SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO: As an organizational psychologist, I (Adam Grant) spend a lot of time in workplaces, and I find paranoia everywhere. Paranoia is caused by people that I call “takers.” Takers are self-serving in their interactions. It’s all about “What can you do for me?”
The opposite is a giver. It’s somebody who approaches most interactions by asking, “What can I do for you?”
I wanted to give you a chance to think about your own style. We all have moments of giving and taking. Your style is how you treat most of the people most of the time, your default.
I have a short test you can take to figure out if you’re more of a giver or a taker, and you can take it right now (see third illustration above).
READ THE FULL SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO BY CLICKING HERE
TO VIEW THE FULL VIDEO CLICK HERE