Sylvania No Comments

August 2019

Featured

Question of the Month:  In a growing and living organisation, how do you ensure that Legitimate Leadership is maintained?
Rolling out Legitimate Leadership in an organisation usually begins with a two-day introduction followed by a set of application modules, to the leadership …
Vignette Case Study: It Is Not About Behaviour, It Is About Intent
Whether trust is granted to a manager, or withheld, by employees is not a function of behaviour but of the manager’s intent …
Article: What Managers Who Care Actually Do
Care is what one person does for another. In the context of legitimate relationships of power at work, it is what managers do for those …
Video: Most Leaders Don’t Even Know The Game They Are In
Leaders are so often so concerned about their status or their position in the organization that they actually forget their real job …

E-mail [email protected] for more information

Question of the Month 
By Leonie van Tonder 
Question: In a growing and living organisation, how do you ensure that Legitimate Leadership is maintained?
Answer: Rolling out Legitimate Leadership in an organisation usually begins with a two-day introduction followed by a set of application modules, to the leadership group. In bigger organisations roll-out is normally done in layers of reporting structures, going downwards. This may take 18 months to two years.
In a growing and living organisation, a number of resignations and appointments will happen during this time. To create a positive continuation of roll-out and application of the Legitimate Leadership Model, you need all on board.
The challenge is to keep new staff in the loop of the Legitimate Leadership Model and to replace the people lost and roles they played Read the full answer by clicking here
 To submit your question, e-mail [email protected]

VIGNETTE CASE STUDY: IT IS NOT ABOUT BEHAVIOUR, IT IS ABOUT INTENT
By Josh Hayman, associate, Legitimate Leadership.
Whether trust is granted to a manager, or withheld, by employees is not a function of behaviour but of the manager’s intent. In other words, “what” managers do to their people in terms of behaviour is not nearly as important as “why” they do it.
The above is central to the Legitimate Leadership Model.
Conceptually, it sounds sensible. Practically, there is a counter argument to this: surely there is a level of “hard behaviour” (think disrespectful language / shouting / verbally abusive behaviour) that would never be tolerated regardless of the intent behind it?
Intent is all well and good, but if you don’t talk to people respectfully, intent doesn’t matter … right? In my early consulting work, I subscribed to this argument.
But in 2013 I learned the truth of the Legitimate Leadership proposition in the tough environs of the South African platinum mining industry.
READ THE FULL CASE STUDY BY CLICKING HERE

ARTICLE: WHAT MANAGERS WHO CARE ACTUALLY DO
By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership.
Care is what one person does for another. In the context of legitimate relationships of power at work, it is what managers do for those in their charge. To Care for someone essentially means to have their best interests at heart. It is about serving the needs of the other person before one’s own.
Good parents instinctively put the child’s interests first because they care unconditionally. Good managers similarly put their employees’ interests first.
For most managers, unlike parents however, this is not an instinctive choice. Rather, it is a deliberate choice that they make repeatedly over time. Care is something, in other words, which managers foster over the course of the reporting relationship they have with those in their charge.
Care moreover is definitely not a “soft and fluffy thing”. Care in the heart is evidenced in both “soft” and “hard” behaviours.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE

VIDEO: MOST LEADERS DON’T EVEN KNOW THE GAME THEY ARE IN
By Simon Sinek, American author on leadership and motivational speaker.
COMMENT ON THIS VIDEO BY WENDY LAMBOURNE OF LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP: Leaders should be judged on the calibre of their people, not business results, because their job is not to produce results but to cultivate people. As Simon Sinek says, the real job of a leader is to take care of (and grow, according to Legitimate Leadership) those in his/her charge. Not all people want to lead but those who do can absolutely learn the behaviours and leadership practices which are aligned to the care and the growth role. From our experience it typically takes 12-18 months for leaders to develop competence and confidence in leading others. This investment in time and money is well worth it. Companies do not put people in charge of expensive technology without training them. So why put people in charge of other people’s lives without preparing them to succeed at doing so?
OUR EXCERPT FROM THIS VIDEO: There are two things that great leaders need to have: empathy and perspective. These things are very often forgotten.
Leaders are so often so concerned about their status or their position in the organization that they actually forget their real job.
The real job of a leader is not about being in charge, it’s about taking care of those in our charge.
I don’t think people realize this and I don’t think people train for this.
READ THE FULL SUMMARY OF THIS VIDEO BY CLICKING HERE
TO VIEW THE VIDEO CLICK HERE

Sylvania No Comments

Most Leaders Don’t Even Know The Game They Are In

By Simon Sinek, American author on leadership and motivational speaker.

COMMENT ON THIS VIDEO BY WENDY LAMBOURNE OF LEGITIMATE LEADERSHIP:  Leaders should be judged on the calibre of their people, not business results, because their job is not to produce results but to cultivate people. As Simon Sinek says, the real job of a leader is to take care of (and grow, according to Legitimate Leadership) those in his/her charge. Not all people want to lead but those who do can absolutely learn the behaviours and leadership practices which are aligned to the care and the growth role. From our experience it typically takes 12-18 months for leaders to develop competence and confidence in leading others. This investment in time and money is well worth it. Companies do not put people in charge of expensive technology without training them. So why put people in charge of other people’s lives without preparing them to succeed at doing so?

OUR EXCERPT FROM THIS VIDEO: There are two things that great leaders need to have: empathy and perspective. These things are very often forgotten.

Leaders are so often so concerned about their status or their position in the organization that they actually forget their real job.

The real job of a leader is not about being in charge, it’s about taking care of those in our charge.

I don’t think people realize this and I don’t think people train for this.

When we’re junior, our only responsibility is to be good at our jobs. That’s all we really have to do. And some people actually get advanced education, or the company trains them, so that they can be really good at their jobs – accounts, or whatever.

Then we work very hard and if we’re good at our job, they promote us.

At some point we get promoted to a position where we’re now responsible for the people who do the job we used to do.

But nobody shows us how to do that.

That’s why we produce managers and not leaders. And the reason our managers are micromanaging us is because they actually do know how to do the job better than us. That’s what got them promoted.

Really what we have to do is go through a transition. We have to go through the transition of first being responsible for the job to being responsible for the people who are responsible for the job.

Some people transition quickly, some people slowly; and unfortunately some people never make that transition at all.

One of the great things that is lacking in most of our companies is that they are not teaching us how to lead. Leadership is a skill like any other. It is a practicable, learnable skill; it is something that you work on.

It’s like a muscle: if you practice it all the days you will get good at it and you will become a strong leader. If you stop practicing, you will become a weak leader.

It’s like parenting. Everyone has the capacity to be a parent. That doesn’t mean everybody wants to be a parent or that everybody should be a parent.

So also for leadership. We all have the capacity to be a leader. That doesn’t mean everybody should be a leader and it doesn’t mean everybody wants to be a leader. And the reason for that is because it comes at great personal sacrifice.

Remember you’re not in charge, you’re responsible for those in your charge.

That means things like when everything goes right you have to give away all the credit, and when everything goes wrong you have to take all the responsibility.

It’s things like when something does actually break or goes wrong, instead of yelling and screaming and taking over you say ‘try again’.

When the overwhelming pressures are on us, at the end of the day great leaders are not responsible for the job – they’re responsible for the people who are responsible for the job.

They’re not even responsible for the results.

I love asking CEOs, ‘what’s your priority?’ They put their hands on their hips, all proud, and say ‘my priority is my customer’. I’m like ‘really, have you even talked to a customer in 15 years?’

There’s no CEO on the planet responsible for the customer. They’re just not. They’re responsible for the people who are responsible for the people who are responsible for the customer.

TO VIEW THE VIDEO CLICK HERE

Sylvania No Comments

What Managers Who Care Actually Do

By Wendy Lambourne, director, Legitimate Leadership.

Care is what one person does for another. In the context of legitimate relationships of power at work, it is what managers do for those in their charge. To Care for someone essentially means to have their best interests at heart. It is about serving the needs of the other person before one’s own.

Good parents instinctively put the child’s interests first because they care unconditionally. Good managers similarly put their employees’ interests first.

For most managers, unlike parents however, this is not an instinctive choice. Rather, it is a deliberate choice that they make repeatedly over time. Care is something, in other words, which managers foster over the course of the reporting relationship they have with those in their charge.

Care moreover is definitely not a “soft and fluffy thing”. Care in the heart is evidenced in both “soft” and “hard” behaviours.

Caring parents feed and clothe their offspring. They give them their love and attention. They educate, guide and support them. They also establish boundaries, discipline them and encourage or even force them to stand on their own two feet.

Managers who Care similarly behave in ways that are both “soft” and “hard”. They do the following:

  • Treat their people with respect.
  • Demonstrate sympathy for their personal concerns.
  • Make themselves available to listen openly to their people’s views.
  • Get to know him/her both as a person as well as an employee because they are genuinely interested in the human being behind the human resource.
  • Keep or stick to promises made because it is important to them not to let their people down.
  • Ensure that their people have the “means” to perform their jobs.
  • Ensure that their people receive the training and coaching they need to do their jobs to the required standard.
  • Involve or consult them on things that affect them.
  • Make sure that they come back or respond to both issues raised and questions asked.
  • Assist with work-related problems by removing obstacles in their people’s way.
  • Keep their people informed regarding how they and the business are performing, because they want to know.

They also do the following:

  • Demand delivery/insist on high standards because they want their people to be the best they can be.
  • Tell people like it is, both the good and the bad news, because speaking the truth to their people is important to them.
  • Take disciplinary action when required, in their people’s best interests.
  • Exercise fairness to all and have neither favourites or non-favourites.

In every interaction they have with their people, managers who Care act with their people’s highest and best interests in mind – which is to set them up to succeed and ultimately realise the best in themselves.

Sylvania No Comments

It Is Not About Behaviour, It Is About Intent

By Josh Hayman, associate, Legitimate Leadership.

Whether trust is granted to a manager, or withheld, by employees is not a function of behaviour but of the manager’s intent. In other words, “what” managers do to their people in terms of behaviour is not nearly as important as “why” they do it.

The above is central to the Legitimate Leadership Model.

Conceptually, it sounds sensible. Practically, there is a counter argument to this: surely there is a level of “hard behaviour” (think disrespectful language / shouting / verbally abusive behaviour) that would never be tolerated regardless of the intent behind it?

Intent is all well and good, but if you don’t talk to people respectfully, intent doesn’t matter … right? In my early consulting work, I subscribed to this argument.

But in 2013 I learned the truth of the Legitimate Leadership proposition in the tough environs of the South African platinum mining industry.

I’d had some discussion with others far more experienced in the application of the model about this issue, and they’d simply said “you’ll be amazed what employees will forgive their managers for, when the intent is right”.

In 2013 I had the opportunity to work with a large team helping a major platinum producer to apply the model in their business. I was assigned to one of the mine shafts as a “coach” to the managers on the shaft. This particular shaft was nearing the end of its life, but word on the street was that it was the most dependable operation in the business, with safety and production targets being met with amazing consistency – unusual in mining.

On my first visit (and my first foray into the mining production environment) I was introduced to the “mine manager’s assistant” (let’s call him Wayne), who I quickly established was the real authority on the shaft. He did not immediately come across as “warm and inviting”, but after establishing what we were there to do and that the project was endorsed by the group head of mining, he quickly set about arranging access for me and finding out what I needed in terms of support.

My first order of business was a series of two-hour introductory presentations on the model to shift supervisors, which had to be done at 4:30am before their underground shift started. Trying to engage people in learning activities post-shift would have been be a waste of time.

Wayne arranged the schedule for me – I’d start the following morning. He then invited me to a monthly pre-arranged meeting at 3pm that day so I could be introduced to all the shift supervisors. “Don’t be late,” he said.

I duly arrived at the meeting venue at 2:50pm, to find the meeting had already started. The room was filled with Wayne, his mine overseers and all of the shift supervisors on the shaft. As I walked through the door, Wayne gave me a sideways glance. “Oh, its the care and growth guy,” he said. And to me: “You may not want to be here for this conversation, but go and take a seat in the back.”

The mood in the room was tense. Clearly something had happened during the day that Wayne was displeased about. What happened next can only be described as the quintessential “skop en donder” (literally: “kick and thunder”) that is, sometimes unkindly, stereotypical of the mining industry.

Wayne gave the entire room a tongue-lashing the likes of which I had never seen in my life to that point. He shouted, swore, and singled out individuals to point out how incompetent and careless they had been. Personal, verbal abuse continued for 45 minutes. All of my experience told me that there was a severe leadership problem here, and that my work was cut out for me.

The next morning at 4:30am I started my first introduction to the framework with a group of shift supervisors. I fully expected to hear lots of stories about the poor leadership and abusive behaviour on the shaft.

When introducing people to the framework we pose the question, ‘describe the manager you would work for willingly’.

In this case I gave the group a set of cards and cokie pens and asked them to write their ideas and themes on the cards and I put them on the wall. As I started the exercise I got the adjectives that we expect (supportive, listens, is fair, gives direction, has empathy, is decisive, gives me space, etc). As I turned over the next card, instead of another adjective, a name was written on the card: “Wayne D”.

I paused the session and clarified that “Wayne D” was the mine manager’s assistant. I was at a loss for words.

The person who wrote the card looked me squarely in the eye and, in classic mining vernacular, said: “Look, Wayne might a little ‘roff’ (rough), but I’d take a bullet for him – we all would.” There was furious nodding from all present. I asked why. “We come first. Always. You can go to him with any problem, any time of the day or night and he will bend over backwards to help you. Sometimes, the help you need is a large “klap” (slap) to set you straight again, and that’s fine by me. When there is an accident underground, he’s the first person to gear up and head down, and he’s risked his life to save the lives of others on the shaft. He always has our back. He demands the best from us, and gives us his best. So, if he thinks we’ve messed up he can say what he likes to us. We deserved what we got from him yesterday anyway.”

I ran three more sessions with the shift supervisors that week. Without exception, every person told me that Wayne was absolutely the best boss they had ever worked for, and was the absolute epitome of a leader aligned with the two criteria, care and growth.

This experience has stuck with me as proof positive that it really isn’t about their behaviour at all, it is about their Intent.

Sylvania No Comments

August 2019 – Question of the Month

By Leonie van Tonder 

Question of the Month:  In a growing and living organisation, how do you ensure that Legitimate Leadership is maintained?

Answer:  Rolling out Legitimate Leadership in an organisation usually begins with a two-day introduction followed by a set of application modules, to the leadership group. In bigger organisations roll-out is normally done in layers of reporting structures, going downwards. This may take 18 months to two years.

In a growing and living organisation, a number of resignations and appointments will happen during this time. To create a positive continuation of roll-out and application of the Legitimate Leadership Model, you need all on board.

The challenge is to keep new staff in the loop of the Legitimate Leadership Model and to replace the people lost and roles they played.
To not lose momentum, the leadership must review the gaps on at least a 3-6 monthly basis. New appointees must be ‘brought into the fold’ regularly. Otherwise there will be puzzle-pieces missing and this will produce a brake in communication and application of the principles and practices.

This will require repeats of the two-day introduction for new appointees, and the application models.
In general it is also important to:

Create a “community of practise” where people can report on their achievements and challenges with care and growth

Assess all decisions on the basis of how they measure up to the Legitimate Leadership criteria.

Highlight good leadership actions and review bad/not-so-successful actions in the light of Legitimate Leadership principles – and learn how to do it better next time.